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English Buildings

I recently found this blog, English Buildings, which includes some history about each featured bit of architecture. Its rather interesting and could provide some inspiration for builders. I feel tempted to make a version of the one pictured here – modified to have a rooftop airship dock.

 

In a recent post the writer tells of the practice of medieval masons using lead to add strength to architectural details:

Medieval masons used lead in their joints quite often, especially when
building intricate, willowy structures such as window tracery, narrow
shafts (mini-columns), and pinnacles. They did this by drilling vertical
holes through the pieces of stone and lining them up. Then they called
in the plumber – the man who worked with lead – and he undertook the
painstaking task of pouring the molten lead in from the top. When the
lead set, the pinnacle had a solid armature, adding greatly to its
strength.

Working with molten lead in this way must have been a
perilous business, especially if you were at the top of a 200-foot tower
at the time. But it seems to have been a common occurrence in the Middle Ages, and
helped architectural details such as this pinnacle survive from the 15th
to the 20th or 21st century.

Of all the hazards of Babbage I haven’t had to dodge hot falling lead.  But seriously it sounds like a brilliant idea. They built things to last.

 

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7 Comments

  1. Junie Ginsburg Junie Ginsburg December 22, 2011

    “Of all the hazards of Babbage I haven’t had to dodge hot falling lead.  But seriously it sounds like a brilliant idea…”

     

    I agree.

    *sets about a plan to drop hot molten lead from the top of a nearby building where more construction may or may not be occuring in the near future at random times of day*

    • Jedburgh30 Dagger Jedburgh30 Dagger December 22, 2011

      Two words Juniper: “Shot Tower”.  If the fall was of a sufficient height, you may end up making round shot, not geysers of molten lead.

      • Junie Ginsburg Junie Ginsburg December 22, 2011

        I do believe some experimentation is in order.  For science!

        Luckily, the Brunel…I mean “a nearby building where more construction may or may not be occuring in the near future” has roofs of different heights.  (Victor even ordered lead!  I saw it on his list!)

        *eyes the clocktower*

  2. Kimika Ying Kimika Ying December 22, 2011

    Um, Junie….[rereads]…That’s not quite what I meant but I’m not saying don’t do it. And I like your proofreading style.

    • Junie Ginsburg Junie Ginsburg December 22, 2011

      Heheheh…I know I took it out of context.  I prefer to read selectively.  *grin*

      It’s fun!

  3. Tepic Harlequin Tepic Harlequin December 22, 2011

    That’s Tewksbury Guild Hall, isn’t it?

    • Edward Pearse Edward Pearse December 22, 2011

      Abingdon Town Hall, according to the link.

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