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A Typewriter Alphabet

  is for Adler

(reference)

 

 

is for Blickensderfer

(reference)

 

 

  is for Crandall

(reference)

 

 

  is for Diskret

(reference)

 

 

  is for Edison

(reference)

 

 

  is for Franklin

(reference)

 

 

  is for Graphic

(reference)

 

 

  is for Hanson

(reference)

 

 

  is for Imperial

(reference)

 

 

  is for Junior

(reference)

 

 

  is for Keystone

(reference)

 

 

  is for Lambert

(reference)

 

 

  is for Merritt

(reference)

 

 

  is for Niagara

(reference)

 

 

  is for Oliver

(reference)

 

 

  is for Pettypet

(reference)

 

 

is for Quiet-Riter

(reference)

 

 

 

  is for Remington

(reference)

 

 

  is for Salter

(reference)

 

 

  is for Toshiba

(reference)

 

 

  is for Underwood

(reference)

 

 

  is for Victor

(reference)

 

 

  is for Williams

(reference)

 

 

  is for Xcel

(reference)

 

 

  is for Yetman

(reference)

 

 

  is for Zephyr

(reference)

 

 

(images for the above typewriter keys are here)

I was started on this by this alphabet which appeared on Letterology.

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17 Comments

  1. Mr Tenk Mr Tenk October 1, 2011

    P is for The Pen Room in Birmingham, England, where they let you take them down from the shelf and use them

     

  2. Arconus Arkright Arconus Arkright October 1, 2011

    “I” is for impressed.

  3. Glaubrius Valeska Glaubrius Valeska October 1, 2011

    Lovely work Mss Ying! Interesting that function following form in some of these creates an ‘ergonomic’ design! Of all of them, the Hanson is the only one that strikes me with the question “what the hades were they thinking?” A design for former crystal ball readers, perhaps?

    • Kimika Ying Kimika Ying October 1, 2011

      Thank you so much. :)    This one is interesting in that each of the keys on the bottom row will type whole words, such as “the, you, was, all”, etc. 

      And I’ve found one for the letter “Q” so the alphabet is complete.

      • Aeolus Cleanslate Aeolus Cleanslate October 2, 2011

        I have to say that the “simple words” idea is genius. The presesnce of a “.com” button on my iPhone is similarly brilliant.

        Too often, brilliant innovations are dashed on the rocks of consumer inertia. How does one break free of that cycle?

  4. Orpheus Angkarn Orpheus Angkarn October 2, 2011

    Ahhh, the Victor typewriter…. those are the ones that, when you think you’re done typing your document, will sneak off and redo the same document 2-5 times, leaving the poor author with a document that has little resemblance to the original work, no?

  5. Wiggy Undertone Wiggy Undertone October 3, 2011

    Fantastic!  My favorite is the Hanson.  It reminds me of the IBM Selectric ball.

     

     

  6. Junie Ginsburg Junie Ginsburg October 3, 2011

    /me wonders how many others here learned to “keyboarding” on manual typewriters before anything else.

    Probably a good number of us, I would guess.

    • Mr Tenk Mr Tenk October 3, 2011

      /me wonders how many of us went off to college with their parent’s typewriter in a box.

      • Junie Ginsburg Junie Ginsburg October 3, 2011

        Heh. 

        When I was a kid our typewriter had a cursive typeset.  I hated it at the time, but wish I had it now.  Don’t remember the manufacturer, unfortunately.  Found it!   Olympia Splendid 33. (This one has rain on it.)

        Olympia typewriter

         

         

      • Edward Pearse Edward Pearse October 3, 2011

        Had the luxury of an electric typewriter at home and Apple IIe in High School (and a Commodore 64 in the Physics lab).

        Never did take proper typing classes.

        • Junie Ginsburg Junie Ginsburg October 3, 2011

          You kids and your fancy gadgets.

        • Glaubrius Valeska Glaubrius Valeska October 5, 2011

          I learned how to type on an Apple IIe at home by playing the old Micropose games!

    • Stargirl Macbain Stargirl Macbain October 3, 2011

      I started learning on an old-school “portable” typewriter. A monsterous black-and-gold thing that had a peculiar smell about it and had a folding leather case that went over it (Da always said it was because it had been lubed with whale oil. I still don’t believe him.). The number of times I skinned my knuckles because I punched my fingers down between the keys! but man, could I speed away on a regular computer keyboard after that!

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